CVSA Past President Deputy Chief Mark Savage Testifies at U.S. Subcommittee on Highways and Transit “Under Pressure: The State of Trucking in America” Hearing

Sticky: No
June 13, 2019

On June 12, 2019, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) Past President Deputy Chief Mark Savage with the Colorado Highway Patrol testified on behalf of the Alliance and the enforcement community at the U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure’s Subcommittee on Highways and Transit hearing, titled “Under Pressure: The State of Trucking in America.”

Chairwoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Ranking Member Rodney Davis (R-Ill) convened the hearing to receive feedback from motor carriers, owner-operators, law enforcement and safety advocates about the dilemmas affecting commercial motor vehicle and roadway safety.

Congresswoman Norton started the hearing by stating, “As Congress looks to enact changes to trucking policy and the reauthorization, upcoming, how to improve safety must be a guiding question and new questions, new challenges, new statistics, need to be explained.”

“This subcommittee is continuing to ramp up its efforts to reauthorize the federal surface transportation programs and policies,” said Congressman Davis. “So far, we’ve held two hearing to gather stakeholder feedback on possible changes to those programs and policies. Today, we’re turning our attention to the policies and programs that impact trucking. The trucking industry’s contribution to the country’s economy is very significant… Safety has and must continue to be a focus of the surface transportation reauthorization bill.”

During Deputy Chief Savage’s testimony to the subcommittee, he called attention to the near standstill pace of regulatory activity at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), which results in inferior alternatives to definitive regulatory action, such as interpretations, letters, electronic communications, enforcement guidance, frequently asked questions and other means to provide enforcement and industry with clarity on issues that arise, with the expectation that regulations will be updated in the future.

“Unfortunately, that update often never takes place, resulting in an inconsistent understanding of the requirements,” said Deputy Chief Savage. “This lack of clarity in the regulations is further complicated by the growing list of exemptions issued to various segments of industry.”

Deputy Chief Savage discussed the challenges faced by the enforcement community regarding inconsistencies in Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations caused by exemptions. CVSA is generally opposed to exemptions in legislation or regulations. The Alliance recognizes that there may be limited instances when exemptions are appropriate and do not compromise safety; however, overall, CVSA believes exemptions have the potential to undermine safety and complicate enforcement.

Deputy Chief Savage addressed the committee, “We encourage members [of Congress] to minimize the number of exemptions written in legislation and to consider the practical impacts of any new requirements or programs to the enforcement community’s ability to conduct our critical life-saving activities.”

“CVSA has a number of recommendations aimed at improving CMV safety,” said Deputy Chief Savage. “However, from our perspective, it all boils down to one thing: providing the motor carrier industry and the enforcement community with a regulatory framework that is clear, safety driven and enforceable.”

He added, “Those of us in the enforcement community, including FMCSA, as well as those in the regulated industry, cannot achieve our mutual goal of reducing crashes and saving lives without clearly written safety regulations based on unbiased data and designed with safety as the top priority.”

  • Other witnesses who presented testimony included:
  • Cathy Chase, President, Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety
  • Chris Spear, President and CEO, American Trucking Associations
  • Todd Spencer, President, Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association
  • LaMont Byrd, Director, Health and Safety Department, International Brotherhood of Teamsters
  • Jason Craig, Director of Government Affairs, C.H. Robinson
  • Rodney Noble, Senior Director for Transportation Global Procurement, PepsiCo
  • Andy Young, Truck Safety Advocate

Subsequent questions from committee members to the panel of witnesses included a wide range of topics, such as intrastate transportation for commercial motor vehicle drivers 18-21 years old, rear-end and side impact (underride) guards, speed limiters, electronic logging devices and hours-of-service regulations, automated and autonomous technologies, sleep apnea, chameleon carriers, etc.

The U.S. Subcommittee on Highways and Transit is responsible for the development of national surface transportation policy, construction and improvement of highway and transit facilities, implementation of highway and transit safety programs and research activities, and regulation of commercial motor vehicle operations. Within this scope of responsibilities, the subcommittee has jurisdiction over many U.S. Department of Transportation programs, including:

  • Federal aid highway program administered by the Federal Highway Administration
  • Federal transit programs administered by the Federal Transit Administration
  • Highway safety grants and research programs administered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Commercial motor vehicle safety programs and regulations administered by FMCSA

View CVSA’s written testimony and an archived video recording of the “Under Pressure: The State of Trucking in America” hearing.

 

International Roadcheck Starts Today

Sticky: No
June 4, 2019

Starting today, June 4, 2019, commercial motor vehicle inspectors will conduct inspections of large trucks and motorcoaches for 72 hours as part of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck annual enforcement initiative. Commercial motor vehicles and their drivers will be checked at inspection sites, weigh stations, strategic locations and roving patrol locations on public roadways in Canada, Mexico and the United States.

Each year, International Roadcheck places special emphasis on a category of violations. This year’s focus is steering and suspension systems. While compliance of these vehicle components is always part of the North American Standard Inspection Program, CVSA is highlighting steering components and suspension systems this year as a reminder of their importance to highway safety.

International Roadcheck is a high-visibility enforcement initiative meant to call attention to the everyday hard work of commercial motor vehicle inspectors and the many safety-compliant large truck and motorcoach drivers. Since its inception in 1988, more than 1.6 million roadside inspections have been conducted during International Roadcheck.

During International Roadcheck, CVSA-certified inspectors will primarily conduct the North American Standard Level I Inspection, a 37-step procedure that includes an examination of driver operating requirements and vehicle mechanical fitness.

The vehicle aspect of an inspection includes checking critical vehicle inspection items such as: brake systems; cargo securement; coupling devices; driveline/driveshaft; driver’s seat (missing); exhaust systems; frames; fuel systems; lighting devices (headlamps, tail lamps, stop lamps, turn signals and lamps/flags on projecting loads); steering mechanisms; suspensions; tires; van and open-top trailer bodies; wheels, rims and hubs; windshield wipers. Inspectors also check other vehicle components such as rear impact guards as part of the vehicle inspection. Additional items on buses, motorcoaches, passenger vans or other passenger-carrying vehicles include emergency exits, electrical cables and systems in engine and battery compartments, and seating (temporary and aisle seats).

The driver portion of the inspection will include evidence of annual inspection, and review of the driver’s license (operating credentials), Medical Examiner’s Certificate and Skill Performance Evaluation Certificate (if applicable), the driver’s record of duty status and vehicle inspection report(s) (if applicable). Inspectors will also check drivers for seat belt usage, alcohol and/or drug impairment, sickness or fatigue.

If no critical vehicle inspection item violations are found during the Level I Inspection, a CVSA decal is applied. However, when a required rear impact guard is inspected, a CVSA decal will not be issued if violations are present. If an inspector identifies critical vehicle inspection item violations that meet the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria, that vehicle will be rendered out of service until repairs are made.

International Roadcheck is sponsored by CVSA, North America’s leading commercial motor vehicle safety enforcement organization, with participation by the U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators and Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes (SCT) (Ministry of Communications and Transportation) of Mexico.

CVSA’s Operation Safe Driver Week Set for July 14-20 with a Focus on Speeding

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April 30, 2019

Drivers’ actions contributed to a staggering 94 percent of all traffic crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) 2015 Traffic Safety Facts report.

In response to this issue, law enforcement personnel will be on the lookout for commercial motor vehicle drivers and passenger vehicle drivers engaging in dangerous driver behaviors July 14-20 as part of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) Operation Safe Driver Week. Drivers engaging in unsafe driving behaviors will be pulled over by law enforcement and may be issued a warning and/or citation.

  • In 2017, speeding was a contributing factor in 26 percent of all traffic fatalities, according to NHTSA. That’s 9,717 lives lost due to speeding.
  • During last year’s Operation Safe Driver Week, 16,909 passenger vehicle drivers and 1,908 commercial motor vehicle drivers were issued citations for speeding. In addition, 17 commercial motor vehicle drivers and 714 passenger vehicle drivers were cited for driving too fast for the conditions.
  • According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute, speeding has been a factor in more than a quarter of crash deaths since 2008.
  • According FMCSA’s 2016 Large Truck and Bus Facts, speeding of any kind was the most frequent driver-related crash factor for drivers of commercial motor vehicles and passenger vehicles.

For these reasons, CVSA selected speeding as the emphasis area for this year’s Operation Safe Driver Week and law enforcement jurisdictions throughout North America will be endorsing, promoting and supporting the following message: Late won’t kill you, speeding will.

“For more than two decades, speeding has been involved in nearly one-third of all motor vehicle fatalities,” said CVSA President Chief Jay Thompson with the Arkansas Highway Police. “That is unacceptable, especially because it’s preventable. We will continue to educate the public on the dangers of speeding and we will identify individuals who are speeding on our roadways and may issue citations as a deterrent to future speeding tendencies and to affect diver behavior.”

In addition to the emphasis on speeding, law enforcement personnel will be tracking other dangerous driver behaviors throughout Operation Safe Driver Week, such as distracted driving, texting, failure to use a seatbelt, following too closely, improper lane change, reckless or aggressive driving, failure to obey traffic control devices, evidence of drunk or drugged driving, etc.

A 2014 study, titled “Do Traffic Tickets Reduce Motor Vehicle Accidents? Evidence from a Natural Experiment,” investigated whether traffic violation enforcement actually reduces the number of motor vehicle crashes. The study’s author used one of the best-known enforcement programs, Click It or Ticket, which focuses on mandating seat belt use and ticketing violators. The study found that the Click It or Ticket campaign decreased motor vehicle crashes by roughly 11 percent and found that a 1 percent increase in citations issued led to a 0.28 percent decline in motor vehicle crashes. The ticketing campaign also reduced the number of non-fatal injuries from motor vehicle crashes.

“As unpopular as traffic citations are among drivers, we know that driver behavior does respond to contacts with law enforcement and warnings and citations,” said Chief Thompson. “Roadway safety is our top priority and this traffic enforcement initiative supports our goal of making sure everyone driving on our roadways is doing so safely.”

CVSA’s Operation Safe Driver Program was created to help to reduce the number of crashes, deaths and injuries involving large trucks, buses and passenger vehicles due to unsafe driving behaviors. Operation Safe Driver Week is sponsored by CVSA, in partnership with FMCSA and with support from industry and transportation safety organizations. The initiative aims to help improve the behavior of all drivers operating in an unsafe manner – either in or around commercial motor vehicles – through educational and traffic enforcement strategies to address individuals exhibiting high-risk driving behaviors.

To find out about Operation Safe Driver Week enforcement events going on in your area, contact the agency or department responsible for overseeing commercial motor vehicle safety within your jurisdiction.

More than 500 Transportation Safety Professionals Gathered at CVSA Workshop in St. Louis, Missouri

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April 12, 2019

More than 500 enforcement personnel, government officials and industry representatives attended the CVSA Workshop, March 31-April 4, 2019, in St. Louis, Missouri. Participants attended membership, region, committee and program meetings, as well as informational sessions, aimed at improving uniformity and reciprocity in commercial motor vehicle safety and enforcement by sharing information, developing best practices, and enhancing roadside inspection program activities and services.

The week started with the general session. Attendees heard from Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Administrator Raymond Martinez. Administrator Martinez discussed a variety of topics and provided updates on many issues. He stated that, just a few days prior, U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao announced that the agency sent a notice of proposed rulemaking to reform hours-of-service regulations to the Office of Management and Budget. In addition, Administrator Martinez provided an update on the Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse final rule, 2019 grants (which he proudly stated comprises nearly 57 percent of the agency’s annual budget), human trafficking prevention, addressing the recent increase in crashes involving large trucks and buses, and he devoted some of his time to acknowledge recent deaths of law enforcement officers while performing traffic safety functions.

Administrator Martinez also addressed a “hot-button topic” – electronic logging devices (ELDs). “We are in a time of transition regarding ELDs,” said Administrator Martinez. “This is a process. It takes time to achieve equilibrium any time you have a fairly dramatic change in regulation, process and standard operating procedures. This introduction of ELDs is a pretty dramatic shift in the industry. We don’t want to minimize that. I believe there has been an honest effort on the part of industry to comply. A large segment of that community, the overwhelming majority, want to be safe on the road and they understand the challenges, just as we do. So, we have to work together and I believe that’s the way we will get this done. This is a process and we are in the middle of the process.”

CVSA presented Timothy Dean, of Werner Enterprises, with the 2019 International Driver Excellence Award (IDEA). IDEA is CVSA’s industry-wide driver excellence award program. Dean has been with Werner for more than 30 years and safely driven more than 4 million miles without incident. He was selected for the award based on his 30-year history of safe driving, his long-term commitment to the trucking industry, his 20 years competing in driving competitions and his dedication to projecting a positive image.

“When I was a kid walking to school every day, in Omaha, Nebraska, I’d cross a bridge that goes over interstate 80,” said Dean during his acceptance speech. “Me and my older brother would ask ‘Where are all those trucks going? Someday, we’re going to drive a truck and find out where they’re going.’ After 30 years of driving, I can honestly say, I still don’t know where they’re all going. But they keep going. And we’re all playing a critical part in keeping America moving.”

Dean thanked his wife of 35 years, Corissa, and the team at Werner Enterprises. Jaime Maus, vice president of safety and compliance at Werner, also spoke during the ceremony, sharing stories about Dean, not just as a driver, but as a kind, caring and selfless human being.

During his remarks, Dean also acknowledged the truck driving championships and the importance it has played in his profession. He has competed in state and national truck driving championships for 20 years. Dean won the Grand Champion title at the 2011 and 2018 Nebraska Truck Driving Championships. He has placed first, second or third, in nearly every championship since 2001.

Also of importance, Maj. Brian Preston, of the Arizona Department of Public Safety, and Maj. Jeremy “Chris” Nordloh, from the Texas Department of Public Safety, were nominated for the leadership position of CVSA secretary. The secretary election will take place in September at the CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi.

The CVSA Workshop featured these informative and collaborative sessions:

  • At the North American Cargo Securement Harmonization Public Forum, attendees discussed cargo securement regulatory issues and differences; identified inconsistencies in the application of cargo securement enforcement policies; reviewed reports on research findings and securement equipment; and examined new technologies related to cargo securement.
  • Truckers Against Trafficking held an educational session for the commercial motor vehicle enforcement community and members of the truck and bus industries. Attendees examined human trafficking case studies, learned how to identify human trafficking indicators at inspection and interdiction stops, received tips for employing a victim-centered approach and learned ways law enforcement, trucking and busing can work together to fight this crime.
  • The International Fuel Tax Agreement and the International Registration Plan education session featured updates on both programs and interactive discussions.
  • An update was provided on the Unified Carrier Registration Agreement, an interstate agreement governing the collection and distribution of registration information and fees generated under the agreement.
  • Jurisdictions using performance-based brake testers (PBBTs) and others interested in their use met to advance PBBTs as an enforcement tool and to refine procedures and training materials for PBBT use.

FMCSA held an information session on 2017 fatal crash data. During the session, the agency reviewed the latest large truck and bus fatal crash statistics and discussed how FMCSA and key stakeholders can work together to address commercial motor vehicle safety.

Next year’s CVSA Workshop is scheduled for April 19-23, 2020, in San Antonio, Texas.

CVSA’s New 2019 North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria is Now in Effect

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April 1, 2019

Starting today, April 1, 2019, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) 2019 North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria is now in effect. The 2019 out-of-service criteria replaces and supersedes all previous versions.

The North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria is the pass-fail criteria for roadside safety inspections. The purpose of the criteria is to identify critical safety violations. Those violations render the driver, vehicle and/or motor carrier out of service until the condition(s) or violation(s) can be corrected or repaired.

In accordance with CVSA bylaws, the changes were proposed to the Class I Members of the Alliance on Oct. 22, 2018, and subsequently ratified on Oct. 31, 2018. Voting members approved 12 changes to the out-of-service criteria which are effective as of April 1, 2019.

The following changes were made to the out-of-service criteria:

  1. Amendment to Part I, Item 4. DRIVER MEDICAL/PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS, a. Skill Performance Evaluation Certificate by modifying the language. A driver who possesses a valid Skill Performance Evaluation (SPE) but is not complying with the SPE requirements should be placed out of service.
  2. Amendment to Part II, Policy Statement regarding how to deal with expired CVSA decals. It was determined that removing old decals before applying a new one is most appropriate.
  3. Amendment to Part II, Item 1. BRAKE SYSTEMS, g. Brake Drums and Rotors (Discs), (2) by adding language and a picture for cracks in structural supports of a brake rotor. If there are cracks through the vents in rotors, a collapse of the rotor is imminent; therefore, the vehicle should be placed out of service.
  4. Amendment to Part II, Item 2. CARGO SECUREMENT, a. through f. by adding subheadings to each out-of-service condition. Subheadings were added to the Cargo Securement section of the out-of-service criteria to provide uniformity with the rest of the criteria and to make it easier to distinguish between subsections.
  5. Amendment to Part II, Item 2. CARGO SECUREMENT, TIEDOWN DEFECT TABLE by adding defective condition language for the Doleco USA Textile Link Tiedown Assembly. Language was added to the Tiedown Defect Table in the out-of-service criteria so that an inspector can adequately determine if the Doleco USA Textile Link Tiedown Assembly is defective once it is in use.
  6. Amendment to Part II, Item 4. DRIVELINE/DRIVESHAFT, b. Universal Joint, (3) by adding a bearing strap to the out-of-service condition. A bearing strap was added to the out-of-service criteria and a descriptive label was added to the current picture of a bearing strap to help identify and clarify the component.
  7. Addition to Part II, adding new Item 5. DRIVER’S SEAT (MISSING), a. to provide an out-of-service condition for a missing driver’s seat. Drivers using a temporary seat rather than a permanent seat that is secured to the vehicle in a workmanlike manner was added to the out-of-service criteria.
  8. Amendment to Part II, Item 6. EXHAUST SYSTEMS, a. through d. by adding subheadings to each out-of-service condition. Subheadings were added to the Exhaust Systems section of the out-of-service criteria to provide uniformity with the rest of the criteria and to make it easier to distinguish between subsections.
  9. Amendment to Part II, Item 7. FRAMES, by adding subsection (5) to the existing NOTE. It was determined that subsection (5) should not pertain to monocoque-style frames.
  10. Amendment to Part II, Item 10. STEERING MECHANISMS, h. Tie Rods and Drag Links, (3) to add an out-of-service condition for a non-manufactured hole. A non-manufactured hole in a drag link should be placed out of service.
  11. Amendment to Part II, Item 16. BUSES, MOTORCOACHES, PASSENGER VANS OR OTHER PASSENGER CARRYING VEHICLES – EMERGENCY EXITS/ELECTRICAL CABLES AND SYSTEMS IN ENGINE AND BATTERY COMPARTMENTS/SEATING, by adding (TEMPORARY AND AISLE SEATS) to the Critical Vehicle Inspection Item title. This amendment allows vehicles with manufactured seating violations that do not qualify as an out of service condition to receive a CVSA decal.
  12. Amendment to Part III, Items 1. through 10. by adding some subheadings and removing unnecessary language. Revisions were made to Part III of the out-of-service criteria to follow the same format as the rest of the out-of-service criteria.

The CVSA Training Committee, the Education Quality Assurance Team in Canada and the National Training Center in the U.S. will incorporate these changes, as appropriate, into North American Standard Inspection training materials, along with several updated inspection bulletins, inspection procedures, operational policies and training videos.

The North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria is updated annually, effective April 1 of each year, with the release of that year’s edition of the handbook. The “North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria Handbook and Pictorial” identifies critical vehicle inspection items and details the criteria that can prohibit a motor carrier or driver from operating a commercial motor vehicle for a specified period of time or until the condition is corrected. Print and electronic PDF versions of the 2019 edition of the handbook are available for purchase through the CVSA online store. The 2019 out-of-service criteria app will be available this week by searching “CVSA” in the Apple or Google Play stores.

CVSA hosted a webinar on Feb. 13, 2019, outlining the changes to the 2019 out-of-service criteria. The webinar/presentation is available for viewing at any time and for annual in-service/refresher training. CVSA members can access webinar archives through their online CVSA member portal. Once logged in, click on the “My Video & Webinar Library” tab at the top of the page to view a listing of all past webinars.

International Roadcheck Set for June 4-6 With Emphasis on Steering and Suspension

Sticky: No
March 25, 2019

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck will take place June 4-6. Over that 72-hour period, commercial motor vehicle inspectors in jurisdictions throughout North America will conduct inspections on commercial motor vehicles and drivers.

Each year, International Roadcheck places special emphasis on a category of violations. This year’s focus is steering and suspension systems. While checking vehicle compliance is always part of the North American Standard Inspection Program, CVSA is highlighting steering components and suspension systems this year as a reminder of their importance to highway safety.

“Steering and suspension are safety critical systems for any commercial motor vehicle,” said CVSA President Chief Jay Thompson with the Arkansas Highway Police. “Not only do they support the heavy loads carried by trucks and buses, but they also help maintain stability and control under acceleration and braking, keeping the vehicle safely on the road. Furthermore, they keep tires in alignment, reducing chances of uneven tire wear and possible tire failure, and they maximize the contact between the tires and the road to provide steering stability and good handling.”

During International Roadcheck, CVSA-certified inspectors will primarily conduct the North American Standard Level I Inspection, a 37-step procedure that includes an examination of driver operating requirements and vehicle mechanical fitness. Inspectors may opt to conduct the Level II Walk-Around Driver/Vehicle Inspection, Level III Driver/Credential/Administrative Inspection or Level V Vehicle-Only Inspection.

The vehicle inspection includes checking critical inspection items such as: brake systems; cargo securement; coupling devices; driveline/driveshaft; driver’s seat (missing); exhaust systems; frames; fuel systems; lighting devices (headlamps, tail lamps, stop lamps, turn signals and lamps/flags on projecting loads); steering mechanisms; suspensions; tires; van and open-top trailer bodies; wheels, rims and hubs; windshield wipers. Additional items on buses, motorcoaches, passenger vans or other passenger-carrying vehicles include emergency exits, electrical cables and systems in engine and battery compartments, and seating (temporary and aisle seats).

Drivers will be required to provide their driver’s license (operating credentials), Medical Examiner’s Certificate and Skill Performance Evaluation Certificate (if applicable), driver’s record of duty status and vehicle inspection report(s) (if applicable). Inspectors will also check drivers for seat belt usage, sickness, fatigue and apparent alcohol and/or drug impairment.

If no critical vehicle inspection item violations are found during a Level I or Level V Inspection, a CVSA decal will be applied to the vehicle, indicating that the vehicle successfully passed a decal-eligible inspection conducted by a CVSA-certified inspector; however, when a rear impact guard is required and violations are present, a CVSA decal shall not be issued.

If an inspector does identify critical vehicle inspection item violations, he or she may render the vehicle out of service if the condition meets the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria. This means the vehicle cannot be operated until the vehicle violation(s) are corrected. A driver can also be placed out of service for driver credential-related issues or driver conditions, such as fatigue or impairment.

Out-of-service orders and the number, type and severity of safety violations affect a motor carrier’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) score and its Safety Fitness Determination rating. CSA is the safety compliance and enforcement program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) designed to improve safety and prevent commercial motor vehicle crashes, injuries and fatalities by holding motor carriers and drivers accountable for their role in safety.

“International Roadcheck is a high-visibility, three-day commercial motor vehicle and driver inspection and enforcement event,” said Chief Thompson. “However, aside from the increased inspections, we are not doing anything differently than any other day. The inspections performed during International Roadcheck are the same inspections that are conducted the day before International Roadcheck starts and the day after it concludes, as well as any other day of the year.”

Chief Thompson added, “It’s important to remember that inspections are conducted 365 days a year. We publicly announce the dates of this three-day enforcement and awareness initiative in advance because we want all vehicles on our roadways to be safe and compliant.”

International Roadcheck is the largest targeted enforcement program on commercial motor vehicles in the world, with around 17 trucks and buses inspected, on average, every minute in Canada, the United States and Mexico during a 72-hour period. Since its inception in 1988, more than 1.6 million roadside inspections have been conducted during International Roadcheck campaigns.

International Roadcheck is a CVSA program with participation by FMCSA, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators, Transport Canada and Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes (SCT) (Ministry of Communications and Transportation) of Mexico.

CVSA Applauds Senators Gillibrand and Rubio and Representatives Cohen and DeSaulnier for Introduction of the Stop Underrides Act

Sticky: No
March 5, 2019

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) applauds Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), Representative Steve Cohen (D-TN) and Representative Mark DeSaulnier’s (D-CA) efforts to make our roadways safer. On March 5, 2019, they introduced the Stop Underrides Act, which seeks to improve underride protection on commercial motor vehicles by improving performance standards. Additionally, the bill would add underride guards to the list of parts and accessories required to be inspected under Appendix G of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations and establishes a Committee on Underride Protection to oversee underride rulemakings and requirements.  

“As members of the law enforcement community who proactively inspect commercial motor vehicles for safe mechanical fitness during roadside safety inspections, CVSA member jurisdictions know the importance of taking steps to reduce fatalities and serious injuries on our nation’s roadways,” said CVSA Executive Director Collin Mooney. “If passed, the Stop Underrides Act will help mitigate the severity of underride crashes and make our roadways safer.”

 

 

Timothy Dean of Werner Enterprises is CVSA’s 2019 International Driver Excellence Award Winner

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March 5, 2019

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) is proud to announce professional driver Timothy Dean of Werner Enterprises as the winner of the 2019 International Driver Excellence Award (IDEA). Dean has been with Werner for more than 30 years and safely driven more than 4 million miles without incident.

When he found out he’d been selected as this year’s winner, Dean said he was “shocked, honored and humbled.”

Launched in 2015, IDEA recognizes commercial motor vehicle drivers who distinguish themselves conspicuously and beyond the normal call of duty through the achievement of safe operation and compliance carried out with evident distinction for an extended period of time.

“It’s our honor to award Timothy Dean with the 2019 International Driver Excellence Award,” said CVSA President Chief Jay Thompson with the Arkansas Highway Police. “We were blown away by his extraordinary professional driving career, his ongoing commitment to his community and his unwavering dedication to safety.”

Werner Enterprises was founded in 1956 and currently has 7,800 trucks in service, yet only four drivers in the company’s history have achieved the distinction of receiving an award for 4 million accident-free miles; Dean is one of those four exceptional individuals.

“I have quite the support staff at Werner that gives me the tools to be successful at what I do,” said Dean. “The extensive training that Werner provides to its drivers through quarterly safety meetings and ongoing education has been a big part of my success.”

In 2005, Dean was appointed captain of Werner’s Road Team and has served on the team continuously since that time. As a Werner Road Team captain, Dean shares his knowledge and experience of trucking and transportation safety with countless Werner drivers.

“With his tenure on Werner’s Road Team, Tim continues to be a leader, a role model and a mentor, not just for the new members of Werner’s Road Team, but for every employee of Werner Enterprises; drivers and office associates alike,” said Werner’s Director of Safety Jim Kochenderfer. “Tim’s experience and knowledge make him an excellent resource and he always makes time for anyone who needs his assistance, even though he typically travels over 10,000 miles per month.”

In 2009, Dean was selected as an American Trucking Associations’ America’s Road Team captain. America’s Road Team is the American Trucking Associations’ national public outreach program comprised of a small, select group of professional truck drivers who share superior driving skills, remarkable safety records and a strong desire to spread the word about safety on our roadways.

Like many commercial motor vehicle drivers, Dean loves what he does. “I love meeting new people and I love helping new drivers.”

As you might expect for such an extraordinary driver, CVSA’s IDEA isn’t the only award Dean has received throughout his career. He has competed in state and national truck driving championships for 20 years. Dean won the Grand Champion title at the 2011 and 2018 Nebraska Truck Driving Championships, and he has placed, first, second or third, in nearly every championship since 2001.

In 2002, Dean came in first in the four-axle class at the Nebraska Truck Driving Championships. He’d place first in the four-axle class two more times, in 2009 and 2010. He came in first in the flatbed class in 2005, in the tank class in 2011 and 2012, in the three-axle class in 2013 and in the sleeper class in 2018. In 2003, Dean won the Professional Excellence Award. He’d go on to win that award again in 2005, 2008, 2011, 2014 and 2015. In 2012, Dean won the Jerry Wessel Award, which is awarded to drivers who have competed or volunteered at the Championships for at least five years and are rated on professionalism, industry knowledge and attitude. And, in 2018, Dean was the Nebraska Trucking Association’s Safety Management Council October Driver of the Month.

“Having competed for 20 years at the truck driving championships, practicing every year, those competitions allow me to refine my skills,” said Dean.

In addition to his professional awards, Tim also tirelessly helps other drivers every year as they prepare to compete in the truck driving championships. “Tim is an excellent ambassador for our industry,” adds Kochenderfer.

Dean is also heavily involved in the community. He volunteers his time every year at the Cass County Fair to help the Griswold Future Farmers of America chapter and the 4H Cass County Cowpokes. He also presents every year to the driver’s education class at Griswold Community High School. He is also a member of the Mount Calvary Lutheran Church in Villisca, Iowa.

“Tim’s safety record speaks for itself when it comes to distinguishing himself as a safe driver,” said Kochenderfer. “As director of safety for Werner Enterprises, I can assure you that, personally and professionally, Tim Dean’s personal character is beyond reproach.”

With decades of driving experience and millions of accident-free miles driven safely on the road, Dean knows exactly what to do to ensure he is operating safely. “I take ownership and responsibility in my job and the safety of others around me on the road.”

“Drive every mile one at a time and be a courteous driver,” Dean advises. “You have to keep your mind on the job. Limit your distractions, know your capabilities and don’t be influenced by others.”

Dean will be presented with his award on April 1 at the CVSA Workshop in St. Louis, Missouri.

CVSA established IDEA to recognize and officially acknowledge the exceptional careers of professional commercial motor vehicle drivers and their commitment to public safety. As a company dedicated to advancing the safety and efficiency of the commercial transportation industry, HELP Inc. joined with CVSA to sponsor the Alliance’s 2019 International Driver Excellence Award.

When he’s not on the road, Tim enjoys spending time with his wife of 34 years, Corissa, as well as their children and grandchildren. Tim and Corissa also enjoy camping, horseback riding and fishing.

“I’d like to thank my wife Corissa for her 34 years of support,” said Dean. “She’s been the anchor for my kids while I’m on the road. I’ve been blessed.”

Timothy Dean is the second driver from Werner Enterprises in IDEA’s five-year history to win. Charles Endorf, also of Werner, won in 2017.

The 2020 IDEA nomination form will be posted in September 2019.

 

Christopher Turner Joins CVSA as Director of Crash and Data Programs

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February 19, 2019

Director of Crash and Data Programs Christopher Turner

Christopher Turner, a former captain with the Kansas Highway Patrol, joined the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) on Feb. 19, 2019, as director of crash and data programs.

Turner served in law enforcement for more than 20 years and managed the Kansas Highway Patrol’s Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program, size and weight fixed and mobile divisions, and the breath alcohol unit. His law enforcement training focused heavily on crash reconstruction with an emphasis on causation and human factors. Turner retired from the Kansas Highway Patrol in 2019.

Turner was CVSA president (2017-2018), served as chair of the CVSA Election and Finance Committees, and vice chair of CVSA’s Programs Initiatives Committee (now the Policy and Regulatory Affairs Committee) and the Adjudicated Citations Ad Hoc Committee.

“With Chris serving as a member in leadership positions within the Alliance for the past several years, we’re confident that with his extensive experience and knowledge in commercial motor vehicle law enforcement and crash reconstruction, he meets all the professional requirements of this position and will be a great addition to the CVSA staff,” said CVSA Executive Director Collin Mooney.

As director of crash and data programs, Turner will work to standardize commercial motor vehicle crash investigation processes and standards, as well as related training materials. He will work to improve roadside post-crash inspections, crash data collection processes and systems, and coordinate crash data analysis. Turner will also manage the Alliance’s commercial motor vehicle roadside inspection and traffic enforcement data collection programs and initiatives. He will serve as the primary resource and expert on commercial motor vehicle crash reduction efforts, issues and programs, and will provide advice and counsel on crash reduction strategies, crash data standardization and analysis, post-crash analysis and training, crash data quality improvement, judicial outreach and legislation, safety policies, and information systems and technology.

Turner will serve as the CVSA staff liaison for Class II Local Members; the Information Systems Committee; Crash Data and Investigation Standards Committee; CVSA Data Management, Quality and FMCSA Systems Training; and the Operation Safe Driver Program.

“As the new director of crash and data programs, I will draw on my years of experience, education and knowledge to do my part to advance CVSA’s mission, vision and goals,” said Turner. “I have proudly served the state and people of Kansas for more than 20 years and I now look forward to serving the members of the Alliance.”

Turner holds a Juris Doctor degree from Washburn University School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology with an emphasis in religious studies/philosophy from Benedictine College. He is an accredited crash reconstructionist, forensic mapping specialist, standardized field sobriety instructor and drug recognition expert.

With Turner’s addition to CVSA, altogether, the staff has 115 collective years of commercial motor vehicle law enforcement inspection experience in the U.S. and Canada.

CVSA and FMCSA Offer Data Management and Quality Training

Sticky: No
February 12, 2019

Nearly 150 data quality and information system specialists attended CVSA Data Management, Quality and FMCSA Systems Training, Jan. 29-31, 2019, in San Antonio, Texas. This three-day training course, jointly supported by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), was offered to state partners who report inspection and crash records to support federal and state safety programs.

CVSA’s Information Systems Committee and FMCSA worked together to assemble the customer-focused curriculum for attendees. Most sessions were delivered by two instructors – one state and one federal – who provided technical information, encouraged discussion and led hands-on system training.

The general session, moderated by CVSA Information Systems Committee Chair Holly Skaar, research analyst senior for the Idaho State Police Commercial Vehicle Safety Department, kicked off the three-day training event with comments from:

  • CVSA Executive Director Collin Mooney
  • FMCSA IT Customer Engagement Manager Joel Hiatt
  • FMCSA Chief of IT Operations Everett Dowd
  • FMCSA Privacy Officer Pam Gosier-Cox
  • FMCSA Data Quality Program Manager, Analysis Division, Scott Valentine

“As state users within your organization, I hope you realize the important role you play in transportation safety,” said Skaar to attendees during her general session remarks. “Everything we do is data driven. Every decision made that affects public safety is thoroughly researched and supported by data. Those solutions wouldn’t be possible without those of you who work hard every day to ensure the data is accurate and data systems are reliable.”

Each day of the training workshop featured double-track breakout sessions where attendees chose to attend one of two training options. This allowed each attendee to select the sessions that offered the training and information they found most useful and valuable.

Attendees also had the opportunity to meet one-on-one with their state data quality specialist to talk specifically about their state’s data quality performance measures.

This event offered hands-on training on FMCSA’s software systems, such as:

  • Configuring SAFETYNET for Improved Efficiency and Improved Data Quality
  • Understanding the SSDQ Measures
  • Writing Basic and Advanced Queries for Inspections and Crashes
  • Running and Using the Inspection and Crash Data Quality Tool
  • Improving Accuracy and Completeness in Inspections and Crashes
  • SAFETYNET Tips and Tricks

Sessions also included important and relevant topics such as FMCSA cybersecurity and privacy compliance, adjudicated citations, A&I Online, MCMIS and Query Central, FMCSA Portal, DataQs crash topics and Aspen 3.2.

This event also featured a state panel on exploring crash processing issues. During the panel, individuals shared their challenges and offered solutions to improve state crash processes. Through the facilitated discussion, participants learned from one another by sharing examples of how they successfully navigated and solved common problems.

During the closing session, the group worked together to address topics brought up during the previous days of training. Participants proposed ideas about what they wanted to see in future FMCSA systems, asked questions of FMCSA and CVSA representatives during the open forum, and shared their thoughts and opinions about the training overall.